Company:
RBF Consulting, a Michael Baker International Company
Status:
Awarded
Awarded:
Roadway & Highway Project of the Year
Additional Files

Additional Information

Tustin Ranch Road Extension

Project Location:

Tustin, CA

Project Description:

RBF Consulting, a Company of Michael Baker International, provided civil engineering studies and design services for the Tustin Ranch Road Extension in Tustin, CA. The Tustin Ranch Road Extension project is a critical transportation improvement providing a new roadway connection from Walnut Avenue to Warner Avenue through the former MCAS Tustin and alleviating traffic congestion on Red Hill Avenue and Jamboree Road, which run parallel.

The City of Tustin engaged RBF Consulting to complete plans, specifications, and estimates for the new grade separation over two mainline tracks within Southern California Regional Rail Authority right-of-way, a local road, and a flood control channel for Phase II of the construction. The new bridge is part of the new Tustin Legacy development that extends Tustin Ranch Road from the current terminus at Walnut Avenue to the new development. The City of Tustin desired to keep the aesthetic feel and design features from the former MCAS Tustin base.

The project included 1.4 miles of new roadway, sidewalks, sound walls, street and landscape improvements, underground utilities, a bridge structure spanning over 403 feet, and widening approximately 1,000 feet of Walnut Avenue.

Project Justification:

RBF Consulting and the other engineers and architects involved with this project needed to employ unique design techniques in order to successfully complete this project. The City of Tustin desired to keep the aesthetic feel and design features from the former MCAS Tustin base when planning for the new Tustin Legacy Community began. The gigantic airplane hangars stand as distinctive landmarks in Tustin. On the bridge, decorative arched railing mirrors the shape of the hangars, as well as the hills located in east Tustin. On the side of the bridge, arches were fashioned into the concrete to coincide with the Legacy Park theme.

Another important aspect of the design was the use of verdura walls throughout the project. Rounded blocks, offset, kept in theme with the Legacy arches, created a more appealing look than a standard wall, and the plantability of the design proved to be a cost-effective choice. The verdura wall will also be used in the design of the Legacy Park plans.

For the first time, the City of Tustin used bioswales in the Santa Ana/Santa Fe Flood Channel. The addition of decorative rock and native shrubbery along the channel sidings creates a creek-like feel and adds visual enhancements to the channel.

The project incorporated eight Modular Wetland Systems to comply with stringent stormwater regulations and to benefit the community and environment, encompassing a green design with sustainability. The Modular Wetland System is the only stormwater system to utilize Horizontal Flow Biofiltration, as it replicates natural processes to remove a variety of pollutants from stormwater runoff including fine TSS, bacteria, oils and grease, heavy metals and harmful nutrients like nitrate and phosphorus. While most systems utilize a single treatment method, the Modular Wetland System Linear incorporates screening, hydrodynamic separation, BioMediaGREEN absorptive media filtration, and bio retention into a single system. Completely modular, the Modular Wetland System Linear can either replace standard stormwater inlets or function perfectly in an online or off-line design to replace downward flow systems.

In the midst of completion, the client requested to install SmartSensor Matrix at every intersection in lieu of the traditional embedded loops. Benefits of installing SmartSensors will reduce inconvenience to the community and is cost effective in the long-term. These sensors are installed above the ground without affecting traffic flow. Since the sensors install at roadside, they did not require lane closures, and thus reduced the risk of injury or death to workers installing the sensors.

Special Circumstances:

Specific project challenges to overcome included coordination and outreach with existing homeowners, and a church, to replace 2nd story windows and construct a soundwall. Construction working hours were constrained for pile installation due to noise factors. Existing rear wall problems with homeowners needed to be worked around and verdura wall needed to be used due to the height of the bridge and ROW width limitations. Southwestern pond turtle and nesting bird surveys were required as part of the mitigation measures applicable during implementation of the project. The new bridge is a four-span cast-in-place post-tensioned concrete box girder bridge. The bridge spans over 6 lanes of vehicular traffic on Edinger Avenue, SCRRA two main line tracks, and the Santa Ana Flood Control Channel. The substructure consists of seat type abutment on concrete piles and multi-column bents supported on pile footings and concrete piles. Approximately 15,000 linear feet of precast concrete piles was driven during the day that included weekend work for 96 of 190 pile installation within SCRRA’s right-of-way.

The project presented several engineering challenges as construction restrictions along SCRRA’s right-of-way, flood control channel and high risk utilities required an irregular span arrangement.  In addition, the profile and vertical clearance requirements over SCRRA’s tracks limited the superstructure depth. False-work erection and removals were done during non-peak times over weeknights and weekend nights to minimize disruption to the freight and commuter trains. High groundwater was encountered during the construction of the bridge foundation. Beams and plates shoring was utilized for the three intermediate bents and three dewatering wells were used to construct the bent foundation.  Other challenges included closely coordinating with The Gas Company and KinderMorgan for the high pressure 30” line that paralleled the bent foundation and the two jet fuel lines that were in close proximity to the bent footings.

An unforeseen challenge was the discovery of contaminated soil during construction activities for Tustin Ranch Road during the preliminary grading tasks along the Legacy Road footprint. Stained soils were observed and odors were detected by field personnel. A site assessment sampling task was completed and then a Work Plan for Impacted Soil Excavation was developed and approved by the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) with the scope to remove impacted soils, dispose at an approved off-site facility and collect appropriate soil samples to confirm meeting the soil clean-up limits.  All storm drain pipes required water proofing due to high groundwater levels, which contained selenium, and due to there being special construction zones, as designated by the Navy, due to contaminated soils.

The excavation in areas containing potentially contaminated soils was advanced as necessary to remove soil containing chemicals above the residential screening concentrations.  Clean fill from the adjacent non-impacted stockpiles and onsite locations were used as backfill.  The backfill soils were placed as an engineered fill and compacted pursuant to the project geotechnical specifications. 1,194 tons of impacted soils were excavated, stockpiled, and hauled to an offsite thermal treatment system from the stained soil area along Legacy Road.  Fifty loads were hauled under a manifest for thermal destruction.  The regulatory agency concurred that the former fuel spill site on Legacy Road be considered remediated and closed following the approved Work Plan and the residuals at the present location do not pose a threat to human health and the environment.

The Tustin Ranch Road Project has also been awarded the following accolades:
• ACEC OC – 2014 Award of Excellence
• ACEC CA – 2014 Merit Award: Highways/Bridges
• OCEC – 2014 Engineering Project Award

Project Attachments:

See below.

Award Citation::

RBF Consulting was contracted by the City of Tustin as the prime consultant to provide the unique engineering design required to create this critical project – an irregular bridge design spanning three separate crossings, 1.4 miles of roadway and innovative, sustainable elements. Tustin Ranch Road sees 25,000-30,000 cars a day and has significantly alleviated traffic on parallel roads. It was delivered under budget by more than $2 million.

Suggested Award Summary:

RBF Consulting, a Company of Michael Baker International, provided civil engineering studies and design services for the Tustin Ranch Road Extension in Tustin, CA. The Tustin Ranch Road Extension project is a critical transportation improvement providing a new roadway connection from Walnut Avenue to Warner Avenue through the former MCAS Tustin and alleviating traffic congestion on Red Hill Avenue and Jamboree Road, which run parallel. The project showcases engineering improvements, with aesthetic treatments, that combined to highlight engineering excellence with innovative sustainable solutions, such as bioswales with rock walls, Modular Wetland Systems and SmartSensor Matrix.

The City of Tustin engaged RBF Consulting to complete plans, specifications, and estimates for the new grade separation over two mainline tracks within Southern California Regional Rail Authority right-of-way, a local road, and a flood control channel for Phase II of the construction. The new bridge is part of the new Tustin Legacy development that extends Tustin Ranch Road from the current terminus at Walnut Avenue to the new development. The City of Tustin desired to keep the aesthetic feel and design features from the former MCAS Tustin base.

The project presented several engineering challenges including a bridge with an irregular span arrangement and the removal of contaminated soils. Designers and engineers successfully met the project challenges head-on and were able to complete the extension under budget by more than $2 million.

Project Awards

Burris Pump Station Project, Phase 1Skimming the Waters of Newport HaborSunset Ridge ParkLake Forest Sports ParkCoyote Creek Class I BikewayThe Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center (ARTIC) Corona del Mar Water Transmission MainSanta Ana River Interceptor (SARI Line) Relocation ProjectState Route 57 Northbound Widening (Central Phase)20 Story Office Tower and 8 Story parking Structure @ 650/670 Newport Center DriveTustin Ranch Road ExtensionBalboa Boulevard BeautificationPark PlaceSR 57 Widening North SegmentAnaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center (ARTIC)Irvine Regional Park Maintenance Building Replacement ProjectSand Canyon Avenue Grade SeparationSR-57 ImprovementsNewport Forcemain ProjectEmergency Roof Stabilization, Tustin Hangar 1Lower Santa Ana River Reach 9 Phase 2B ProjectNewport Beach Civic Center & ParkCity of San Clemente Recycled Water Expansion ProjectGroundwater Replenishment System Initial ExpansionCerritos Avenue Reconstruction and Sanitary Sewer Improvement Project Bristol Street Improvements Phase IINew Ocelot Exhibit at the Santa Ana ZooNewport Beach's Harbor Litter Removal ProjectBrookhurst Street Widening ProjectI-5/SR-74 Interchange Improvement ProjectOso Creek Multi-Use TrailPCH/Del Prado Street ImprovementsMarina ParkNewland, Edinger, and East Garden Grove Wintersburg Storm Channel Confluence SystemGobernadora Multipurpose BasinLincoln Avenue Widening over the Santa Ana RiverGilbert Street ImprovementsLAGUNA BEACH FESTIVAL OF ARTS FAÇADE/ENTRANCE PROJECTALEGRE AFFORDABLE APARTMENTSCow Camp Road Design – Phases 1A & 1BWest County Connectors ProjectWaste to Energy - Bowerman Power ProjectGlassell Yard Campus Stormwater Low-Impact Development Retrofit ProjectEsencia, Rancho Mission ViejoIrvine Boulevard Pedestrian BridgeOrange County Water District La Palma Groundwater Recharge BasinStanton Central ParkJeffrey Open Space Trail Emerald Bay Entrance WideningPeters Canyon (Wash) Channel Water Capture and Reuse Pipeline Project 91 Express Lanes Pavement Rehabilitation and CMS ReplacementMemory Lane Park, Santa AnaLa Pata Extension Project SR-91 Westbound WideningNewport Beach Country Club Clubhouse400 Spectrum Center Drive Soil Nail WallMyra 3 Stormwater Pump StationSunset/Huntington harbour Dredging and Waterline ProjectHuntington Beach Senior Center In Central ParkNewport Boulevard WideningCrown Valley Park Channel Entry ImprovementsAnaheim Convention Center Betterment VIIMackay ParkTesoro Zone II and Zone B Water FacilitiesPark Avenue Bridge over Grand CanalI-5/La Novia RoundaboutDairy Fork Wetland and Habitat RestorationJeffrey Road Park n' Ride Lot Expansion ProjectTustin-Rose Grade Separation Project, Part of the OCTA OC Bridges Grade Separations ProgramArgyros Girl Scout Leadership CenterWagon Wheel Creek Restoration and Stormwater ManagementOCTA OC Bridges ProgramABC Green Home 3.0 ProjectLaguna Beach Festival of the Arts Grounds RenovationOrtega Highway Emergency Repair ProjectThe Tracks at BreaBaker RanchCity of Buena Park Fire Station No. 61Arlington Drive Bioswale & Dry Weather Diversion ProjectAltair IrvineVillage Pond Park/Veterans Park RenovationMid-Basin Injection: Centennial ParkAgua Chinon CorridorTarbut V’ Torah Phase III & Phase IVRancho Mission Viejo Joint-Use PavilionI-5 HOV Improvement Project between Avenida Pico and Avenida Vista HermosaOrange County Great Park Sports ComplexCrawford Canyon Road Drainage Improvements & ReconstructionSouth Cove DevelopmentGreat Park Ice & FivePoint ArenaLido House HotelBroadcom Corporate Campus (now FivePoint GatewayWest Orange County Water Board Feeder No. 2 RelocationNewhope-Placentia Trunk Sewer Replacement Project State College Boulevard Grade SeparationLos Patrones ParkwayRancho Mission Viejo Multipurpose Path Urth Caffe - OrangeSR91 Widening from SR-55/91 Separation to SR-241/91 SeparationEdwards Lifesciences Parking Structure

Candidate Awards

Natalie A. Meeks, P.E.Tasha M. Kamegai-KaradiYazdan (Yaz) T. Emrani, P.E., Byron Tobey, PE, QSD, LEEP APEric WalkerGidti Ludesirishoti Victoria PilkoPratanu GhoshSteven R MarvinPhil Jones, PE Joshua Nelson, PEVictor AguirreKenneth H. Rosenfield, PEGeorge A. Jurica, PETom BogardRavi Shah, PE, QSP/QSDAmy Choi, EITElizabeth Ruedas, EIT, ENV SPMujahid ChandooRoxanne FollisAmir Aghakouchak, Ph.D., M-ASCE, P.E.Fred MinagarJeffrey Okamoto, PEHarvey GobasChloe GhariosKevin Onuma, P.E.Ryan ChamberlainDr. Adrian MooreMichael Pierce, A.M.ASCERemi Candaele, PE, MS, QSD/QSP, M.ASCEThomas A. Broz, P.E., S.E, F.ASCEKaren Cervantes, S.M.ASCEIsamar Escobar, A.M.ASCEKevin Kondru, P.E., M.ASCEDouglas J. Johnson, P.E., M.ASCEJeremy Redman, PhDChristopher HaireMojgan Hashemi, P.E., M.ASCEOC Report Card Executive CommitteeSteven J. Huff, P.E., M.ASCEWilliam Bennett, P.E., M.ASCEBruce Phillips, P.E.Brad Dybel, PEBryant WongGyssela (Jazzy) Quinabo, E.I.T.Nestor Godinez, PEProfessor Joel LanningElizabeth RuedasDave LoweWei KooBill LawsonAmber GanapathyBob KallenbaughState Senator Josh NewmanGary UrbanDr. Sudarshan KurwadkarClint Isa, PEJason Fix, PEChirath "Chuck" KarunathilakeAmber ShahAshlyn AlexanderJohn C HoganMarionne Philline LapitanDr. C.T. Bathala, PhD, P.E.Kevin Du Mont, P.E.Ziad Mazboudi, P.E., D.WRE, MBADavid Frattone, P.E.Lisa BartlettJennifer BohenGyssela (Jazzy) Quinabo, E.I.T.Andrew Pham, PE, City of IrvineMatthew Cugini, PE, CaltransFarzian Zareian, Ph.D.Thomas T. Kim, PEDon Hoppe, PEDoug Staley, PERavi Shah, PEMark Vukojevic, PEDavid Naish, PhDLacy KellyGary L. Miller, PEKenneth RosenfieldAndrew Easterling, EITSteven L. King, PESteven R. Marvin, PEJose G. Jimenez Jr.
CEC

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