Company:
Orange County Sanitation District
Status:
Awarded
Awarded:
Construction Project of the Year
Additional Files
PDF file of the presentation made at the Water Environment Federation Technology Conference (WEFTEC) on September 30, 2014
Additional Information

Newport Forcemain Project

Project Location:

The project is located along Pacific Coast Highway within the Orange County coastal City of Newport Beach, CA

Project Description:

The Newport Forcemain (NFM) Rehabilitation Project is a full rehabilitation using most trenchless rehabilitation methods available today of approximately 5 miles of pressure large diameter dual sanitary sewer system along Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) through Newport Beach, CA. The NFM system conveys wastewater flow collected from the majority of the City of Newport Beach, including the entire Balboa Peninsula, around Newport Bay, and portions of the City of Costa Mesa. It conveys up to approximately 36 million gallons per day from three pump stations along the PCH.
The purpose of the project is to rehabilitate the entire NFM system from the Bay Bridge to Bitter Point Pump Stations to allow for a life extension of 50 years of reliable operations and to create a redundant force main system. Key elements of the rehabilitation project are necessary to increase system reliability and reduce the risk of Sanitary Sewer Overflows (SSOs), to more safely operate the system by minimizing Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) staff from operating valves from within the vehicular roadway along PCH, and to eliminate the hydraulic deficiencies enabling construction without disruptive in-street bypass piping. The NFM Project aligns directly with OCSD’s Mission of protecting public health and the environment by providing effective wastewater collection, treatment and recycling.

Project Justification:

Contribution to protecting the environment and our way of life - The location of the Newport Forcemain (NFM) pipelines are within the busy PCH right-of-way, and immediately adjacent to the Newport Harbor and Newport Back Bay waters. The consequences of failure along this system resulting in spills would be considerable, if not potentially catastrophic from economic, environmental and community impact standpoints. Its importance in operating continuously on a day-to-day basis cannot be understated.
The entire NFM system was determined to be in need of a major renewal to maintain a reliable level of service and reduce the risk of failure.
The solution to the challenging rehabilitation project included innovative technical, non-technical and business case evaluation techniques described below to derive the best solution for all stakeholders. 
Balancing technical and non-technical elements as decision criteria.
The ultimate design solution for rehabilitation of the NFM system required the careful balancing between technical and non-technical Levels of Service when planning the ultimate renewal of the NFM system. As an overarching technical requirement, the post-rehabilitated system must be capable of conveying peak wet weather flows (2030 projected flows). Also, the system must remain in service during construction and be capable of conveying peak wet weather flows during two winter seasons. Key decision criteria for the selection of the optimal solution for renewal of the NFM included: risk of failure; O&M requirements; hydraulic system requirements; public and worker safety; and system functional life; as well as public impact.
Using Business Case Evaluation (BCE) process to help solve technical and non-technical problems
The use of a BCE process was used to develop a comprehensive rehabilitation strategy for the NFM system to renew it for the next 50 years. Multiple BCEs were developed to help OCSD ultimately decide on approximately $4.5M in savings (NPV) to OCSD by implementing the recommendations. These BCEs included multiple elements in the evaluation process including capital and O&M costs, risk cost, constructability constraints, and community impacts. Through the use of the BCE process, improvements will be made to the system reliability, constructability, operational flexibility, and will reduce impacts to the community during construction and during long-term operation and maintenance activities. Examples of the reduction of community impacts include the elimination of bypass piping within the congested PCH, and the relocation of sections of pipe to be upsized toward the middle of the street out of traveled lanes.
Innovative considerations for a long-term solution
Several innovating design elements were built into the project in an effort to achieve long-term reliability. Requirements included considerations of pipe and fitting materials for longevity and constructability.
For pipe and fittings, non-metallic materials were selected throughout the design. New pipe designed to relieve bottlenecks in the system consists of field welded High-Density-Polyethylene (HDPE) pipe to minimize failure points commonly experienced with jointed or metallic pipe. Existing pipe to be rehabilitated was designed using as a glass fiber/felt Cured-In-Place-Pipe (CIPP) with an innovative closure design. Careful considerations were employed for meeting the full external loading requirements as well as the maximum allowable operating pressure (MAOP) of 40 psi and surge pressures of 90 psi (maximum) in the system. The CIPP liners were designed to act as independent fully structural pipes, assuming that the existing host pipe will fully deteriorate over the life of the rehabilitated pipe. The design process followed the guidance given in the non-mandatory design appendix of the ASTM F 1216 standard. Multiple resin types were also reviewed during the design process, including polyester and vinyl ester resins containing styrene, as well as resins without styrene within the formulas.
Inspection and detection of pipeline failure points
The design included considerations for periodic inspections over the lifecycle of the NFM system. The predominant pipe materials in the NFM after rehabilitation will be thermoset plastic CIPP and HDPE pipe for sections of the new pipe installation. Future inspection of the mains using acoustic technologies, especially “free-swimming” technologies (such as smart ball) is anticipated to provide useful information on potential air pockets and debris buildup as well as locating any small leaks. These inspections are anticipated to be scheduled for every ten years. Closed circuit television (CCTV) is also planned for the inspection of CIPP sections of pipe every 5 to 10 years through isolation of each of the barrels.
Use of Trenchless Rehabilitation Methods to Minimize Community Impacts
The project will require use of several trenchless rehabilitation methods available today, including pressure sewer CIPP rehabilitation and micro- tunneling for replacement of pipe in difficult-to access locations in addition to open cut method replacement. These methods will all result in significant but unavoidable disruption to businesses, traffic, elevated noise levels, vibration and other construction related impacts. The project has considered these impacts very carefully and provided for mitigation measures where practical to lessen the impact to the community.
An analysis was performed on a segment-by-segment basis and recommendations were directly based key decision criteria, including functional system requirements as well as minimizing construction and safety risks, community impact and construction costs. Potential rehabilitation methods that would meet the functional needs of the system as a whole were first identified prior to scoring. Viable rehabilitation methods were then scored for each segment based on its merit in minimizing construction and safety risks, community impact and construction costs.

Special Circumstances:

This project presented unique challenges that were overcome with focused planning, integrative technical and non-technical solutions, and collaborative decision making. Other agencies facing with similar projects can look to this project to overcome the following major challenges that may present themselves in Orange County and beyond:
1. Rehabilitation of sewer facilities within the California Coastal Commission zones.
2. Coordinating and meeting requirements of multiple major jurisdictional stakeholders, including Caltrans and the City of Newport Beach.
3. Elimination of DIP or other metallic pipe in coastal environments or other high chloride soils to mitigate future corrosion induced failure.
4. Integrating the design of various trenchless and trench construction methods (microtunnel, jack and bore, CIPP, open trench) including innovative closure design between differing materials.
5. Accommodating critical and timely work sequencing to tie in to various existing facilities (pump stations) with minimal down time.
6. Development of optimal traffic management solutions of sewer facilities in highly congested traffic areas by providing innovative solutions of traffic management, strong community outreach, various construction methods, and sewer rehabilitation sequencing.
An additional obstacle turned into success during the construction phase included the prompt response to a sewer spill due to pipeline failure just outside the project limits. Immediately upon detection, OCSD responded promptly and the Design Engineer and Contractor have been working closely with OCSD to develop a rehabilitation solution that can be integrated into the existing rehabilitation project. This will lower the risk of failure of the additional assets owned and maintained by OCSD.

Project Attachments:

During the development of the design of this project, there were several lessons learned, integrated approaches, and collaborative solutions employed by OCSD in the evaluation and rehabilitation of their facilities that other owners of sewer collection facilities, especially pressured sewers (force mains) may benefit from.

Award Citation::

OCSD’s Newport Forcemain Rehabilitation (NFM) Project uses most trenchless rehabilitation methods available today for the 5 miles of large diameter pressure dual sewer system along Pacific Coast Highway through Newport Beach, CA. The project is major rehabilitation project of one of Orange County’s critical assets to continue the protection of public health and the environment by providing effective wastewater collection. Construction is complete, it will provide a solution for the next 50 years

Suggested Award Summary:

The Orange County Sanitation District’s Newport Forcemain Rehabilitation (NFM) Project is a full rehabilitation using most trenchless rehabilitation methods available today of approximately 5 miles of pressure large diameter dual sanitary sewer system along Pacific Coast Highway through Newport Beach, CA. The project is major rehabilitation project of one of Orange County’s critical assets to continue the protection of public health and the environment by providing effective wastewater collection. The project is currently in construction and when completed will provide a solution for the next 50 years.
The location of the NFM pipelines are within the busy PCH right-of-way, and immediately adjacent to the Newport Harbor and Newport Back Bay waters. The consequences of failure along this system resulting in spills would be considerable, if not potentially catastrophic from economic, environmental and community impact standpoints. Its importance in operating continuously on a day-to-day basis cannot be understated.
The solution to the challenging rehabilitation project included innovative technical, non-technical and business case evaluation techniques described below to derive the best solution for all stakeholders. 
Balancing technical and non-technical elements as decision criteria.
The ultimate design solution for rehabilitation of the NFM system required the careful balancing between technical and non-technical Levels of Service when planning the ultimate renewal of the NFM system. Key decision criteria for the selection of the optimal solution for renewal of the NFM included: risk of failure; O&M requirements; hydraulic system requirements; public and worker safety; and system functional life; as well as public impact.
Using Business Case Evaluation (BCE) process to help solve technical and non-technical problems
The use of a BCE process was used to develop a comprehensive rehabilitation strategy for the NFM system to renew it for the next 50 years. Multiple BCEs were developed to help OCSD ultimately decide on approximately $4.5M in savings (NPV) to OCSD by implementing the recommendations.
Innovative considerations for a long-term solution
Several innovating design elements were built into the project in an effort to achieve long-term reliability. Requirements included considerations of pipe and fitting materials for longevity and constructability.
Existing pipe to be rehabilitated was designed using as a glass fiber/felt Cured-In-Place-Pipe (CIPP) with an innovative closure design.
Use of Trenchless Rehabilitation Methods to Minimize Community Impacts
The project will require significant construction activities associated with multiple trenchless rehabilitation methods, including CIPP rehabilitation and micro- tunneling for replacement of pipe in difficult-to access locations, in addition to open cut method replacement. These methods were used to reduce the disruption to businesses, traffic, and the entire community.

Project Awards

Burris Pump Station Project, Phase 1Skimming the Waters of Newport HaborSunset Ridge ParkLake Forest Sports ParkCoyote Creek Class I BikewayThe Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center (ARTIC) Corona del Mar Water Transmission MainSanta Ana River Interceptor (SARI Line) Relocation ProjectState Route 57 Northbound Widening (Central Phase)20 Story Office Tower and 8 Story parking Structure @ 650/670 Newport Center DriveTustin Ranch Road ExtensionBalboa Boulevard BeautificationPark PlaceSR 57 Widening North SegmentAnaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center (ARTIC)Irvine Regional Park Maintenance Building Replacement ProjectSand Canyon Avenue Grade SeparationSR-57 ImprovementsNewport Forcemain ProjectEmergency Roof Stabilization, Tustin Hangar 1Lower Santa Ana River Reach 9 Phase 2B ProjectNewport Beach Civic Center & ParkCity of San Clemente Recycled Water Expansion ProjectGroundwater Replenishment System Initial ExpansionCerritos Avenue Reconstruction and Sanitary Sewer Improvement Project Bristol Street Improvements Phase IINew Ocelot Exhibit at the Santa Ana ZooNewport Beach's Harbor Litter Removal ProjectBrookhurst Street Widening ProjectI-5/SR-74 Interchange Improvement ProjectOso Creek Multi-Use TrailPCH/Del Prado Street ImprovementsMarina ParkNewland, Edinger, and East Garden Grove Wintersburg Storm Channel Confluence SystemGobernadora Multipurpose BasinLincoln Avenue Widening over the Santa Ana RiverGilbert Street ImprovementsLAGUNA BEACH FESTIVAL OF ARTS FAÇADE/ENTRANCE PROJECTALEGRE AFFORDABLE APARTMENTSCow Camp Road Design – Phases 1A & 1BWest County Connectors ProjectWaste to Energy - Bowerman Power ProjectGlassell Yard Campus Stormwater Low-Impact Development Retrofit ProjectEsencia, Rancho Mission ViejoIrvine Boulevard Pedestrian BridgeOrange County Water District La Palma Groundwater Recharge BasinStanton Central ParkJeffrey Open Space Trail Emerald Bay Entrance WideningPeters Canyon (Wash) Channel Water Capture and Reuse Pipeline Project 91 Express Lanes Pavement Rehabilitation and CMS ReplacementMemory Lane Park, Santa AnaLa Pata Extension Project SR-91 Westbound WideningNewport Beach Country Club Clubhouse400 Spectrum Center Drive Soil Nail WallMyra 3 Stormwater Pump StationSunset/Huntington harbour Dredging and Waterline ProjectHuntington Beach Senior Center In Central ParkNewport Boulevard WideningCrown Valley Park Channel Entry ImprovementsAnaheim Convention Center Betterment VIIMackay ParkTesoro Zone II and Zone B Water FacilitiesPark Avenue Bridge over Grand CanalI-5/La Novia RoundaboutDairy Fork Wetland and Habitat RestorationJeffrey Road Park n' Ride Lot Expansion ProjectTustin-Rose Grade Separation Project, Part of the OCTA OC Bridges Grade Separations ProgramArgyros Girl Scout Leadership CenterWagon Wheel Creek Restoration and Stormwater ManagementOCTA OC Bridges ProgramABC Green Home 3.0 ProjectLaguna Beach Festival of the Arts Grounds RenovationOrtega Highway Emergency Repair ProjectThe Tracks at BreaBaker RanchCity of Buena Park Fire Station No. 61Arlington Drive Bioswale & Dry Weather Diversion ProjectAltair IrvineVillage Pond Park/Veterans Park RenovationMid-Basin Injection: Centennial ParkAgua Chinon CorridorTarbut V’ Torah Phase III & Phase IVRancho Mission Viejo Joint-Use PavilionI-5 HOV Improvement Project between Avenida Pico and Avenida Vista HermosaOrange County Great Park Sports ComplexCrawford Canyon Road Drainage Improvements & ReconstructionSouth Cove DevelopmentGreat Park Ice & FivePoint ArenaLido House HotelBroadcom Corporate Campus (now FivePoint GatewayWest Orange County Water Board Feeder No. 2 RelocationNewhope-Placentia Trunk Sewer Replacement Project State College Boulevard Grade SeparationLos Patrones ParkwayRancho Mission Viejo Multipurpose Path Urth Caffe - OrangeSR91 Widening from SR-55/91 Separation to SR-241/91 SeparationEdwards Lifesciences Parking Structure

Candidate Awards

Natalie A. Meeks, P.E.Tasha M. Kamegai-KaradiYazdan (Yaz) T. Emrani, P.E., Byron Tobey, PE, QSD, LEEP APEric WalkerGidti Ludesirishoti Victoria PilkoPratanu GhoshSteven R MarvinPhil Jones, PE Joshua Nelson, PEVictor AguirreKenneth H. Rosenfield, PEGeorge A. Jurica, PETom BogardRavi Shah, PE, QSP/QSDAmy Choi, EITElizabeth Ruedas, EIT, ENV SPMujahid ChandooRoxanne FollisAmir Aghakouchak, Ph.D., M-ASCE, P.E.Fred MinagarJeffrey Okamoto, PEHarvey GobasChloe GhariosKevin Onuma, P.E.Ryan ChamberlainDr. Adrian MooreMichael Pierce, A.M.ASCERemi Candaele, PE, MS, QSD/QSP, M.ASCEThomas A. Broz, P.E., S.E, F.ASCEKaren Cervantes, S.M.ASCEIsamar Escobar, A.M.ASCEKevin Kondru, P.E., M.ASCEDouglas J. Johnson, P.E., M.ASCEJeremy Redman, PhDChristopher HaireMojgan Hashemi, P.E., M.ASCEOC Report Card Executive CommitteeSteven J. Huff, P.E., M.ASCEWilliam Bennett, P.E., M.ASCEBruce Phillips, P.E.Brad Dybel, PEBryant WongGyssela (Jazzy) Quinabo, E.I.T.Nestor Godinez, PEProfessor Joel LanningElizabeth RuedasDave LoweWei KooBill LawsonAmber GanapathyBob KallenbaughState Senator Josh NewmanGary UrbanDr. Sudarshan KurwadkarClint Isa, PEJason Fix, PEChirath "Chuck" KarunathilakeAmber ShahAshlyn AlexanderJohn C HoganMarionne Philline LapitanDr. C.T. Bathala, PhD, P.E.Kevin Du Mont, P.E.Ziad Mazboudi, P.E., D.WRE, MBADavid Frattone, P.E.Lisa BartlettJennifer BohenGyssela (Jazzy) Quinabo, E.I.T.Andrew Pham, PE, City of IrvineMatthew Cugini, PE, CaltransFarzian Zareian, Ph.D.Thomas T. Kim, PEDon Hoppe, PEDoug Staley, PERavi Shah, PEMark Vukojevic, PEDavid Naish, PhDLacy KellyGary L. Miller, PEKenneth RosenfieldAndrew Easterling, EITSteven L. King, PESteven R. Marvin, PEJose G. Jimenez Jr.
CEC

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